Welcome to Alley Supply Company!

FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

1. SHOULD THE COLLIMATOR BE PLUMB?

Regardless of the postion of the Site-A-Line (collimator), whether it be straight up or angled as much as 30 degrees off plumb, it is always parallel to the bore line. It will work equally well in all these positions, even canted off 45 degrees on double barrel rifles or shotguns. The optics are self-aligning.

2. WILL THIS TOOL SIGHT-IN ALL CALIBERS OF RIFLES BY SIMPLY ALIGNING THE RIFLE SIGHTS WITH THE COLLIMATOR RETICLE?

No, the operator needs to have at least a basic knowledge of trajectories. We know that a .30-30 will drop a couple of inches more than a .270 at 100 yards so the .30-30's sights have to be raised from the collimation zero to compensate for this drop. Add height from bore to sight line to correction.

3. SHOULD THE RIFLE BE HELD IN A RIGID CLAMP WHILE COLLIMATING?

No! Any foreign stress on the rifle that is not evident in the rifle in the field will have a direct effect on its point of impact. For best results, the rifle should be collimated in one's hands and not in a vise.

4. WHEN AN ACTION IS RE-ASSMBLED TO IT'S STOCK WILL THE POINT OF IMPACT CHANGE?

This is very likely. A false collimation reading will frequently result. With bolt actions, the barrel and action will often be found to be in a different position than its proper seat, regardless of the quality of the bedding job. A good method of re-seating the action that most often works: Stand the rifle butt on the toe of your shoe, having your heel on the ground but toe off the ground. Hit the muzzle three or four times with a sizeable wooden mallet. This will in a sense, simulate recoil and seat the metal parts to the wood. After this is done, a more accurate collimation reading can be obtained as the stresses, if any, will be similiar to those in evidence at the time of firing.

5. WILL BENCH REST FIRING PROVE THE ACCURACY OF THE SITE-A-LINE?

Yes! However, as we all know, the rifle barrel should never be held down on any firm object. Resting the fore-end in the hand is the best method and no change in point of impact will ba induced. DO NOT try to "test" the Site-A-Line against a known rifle that is "sighted-in". Any divergence will look seven times worse than it is due to the optical magnification leading to confusion. Also, PLEASE - remove spud before firing!

6. WILL THE SITE-A-LINE SHOW ERRORS IN RIFLE/SHOTGUN SCOPES AND MOUNTS?

Yes! The Site-A-Line was used extensively in the design of five of our most popular scope mounts in existance today. The rigidity of holding and clamping methods and accuracy of adjustments were determined through the use of the Site-A-Line. On many of the older mounts of various makes, errors may easily found through the use of this tool -- frequently with the help of the mallet on the muzzle treatment. A movement of less than 1/1000 of an inch (.001") in any part of the sighting equipment will be quite noticeable.

7. WILL A SITE-A-LINE HELP IN DOING AN "ACCURACY JOB" ON A RIFLE?

You bet! Our collimator will show effects of errors and faults in barrels, barrel bedding, action bedding, scopes, mounts, iron sights and stock warpage. All in a matter of a very few minutes.

8. DO ADJUSTMENTS HAVE TO BE MADE TO THE SITE-A-LINE TO COMPENSATE FOR VARIATIONS IN HEIGHTS OF SIGHTS FROM THE BORE LINE?

No: A collimator corrects for this optically, All iron sights and hunting scopes currently an the market can be collimated. For the very high, "See through mounts", we have our Collimator Extension.

9. HOW MUCH TIME CAN BE SAVED?

A saving of 90% on inexpensive side mounts of the type usually installed on .22 rifles is not uncommon. A saving of 70% on side mounts for the hunting type rifle and a saving of 60% on top mounts as well as iron sights. In addition -- the assurance that the scope reticle will always be in the center of the field meaning that a perfect job is guaranteed.

10. WHAT CALIBERS WILL IT FIT?

We currently make 53 sizes of spuds to fit all currently manufactured rifles, handguns and shotguns as well as special purpose spuds to fit military arms and also muzzle loaders.  In addition: .50-cal BMG!

11. ARE SPUD DIAMETERS CRITICAL?

We grind all spuds to fit the bores with a slip fit so as to not damage or seize in a barrel. Parallelism and diameter are extremely close in tollerances.

12. DOES IT WORK ON A BENT BARREL?

Barrels with bends (and most barrels do have bends to one degree or another) has no effect on the accuracy of the collimator provided that the bend is not in the last three inches of the bore at the muzzle. Again, that last 2-1/2 inches governs the flight of the bullet.

13. WHICH RETICLE SHOULD I CHOOSE?

We make the Site-A-Line in three types of reticles: The old standby, Diagonal Crosshair, the newer Circular Peep as well as the Square Grid. All are equally accurate and it is simply a matter of personal preference as to what the operator would like to see in the way of a "target". Both the Circular Peep and the Square Grid offer 4-minutes of angle reference spacing in the lines but the Diagonal Crosshair is the most popular in sales. Properly done, one works to the "center" of the collimator, regardless of reticle type. Take your pick!

14. CAN I ADJUST MY SITE-A-LINE?

DO NOT ATTEMPT TO ADJUST YOUR SITE-A-LINE!  These units are precisely adjusted for collimation and focus at the factory. No other adjustments are necessary, nor should such be attempted.  Tampering will void the guarantee.  The instrument must be returned to the factory for re-adjustment.

SITE-A--LINE is adjusted to infinity to eliminate parallax. however, parallax error may be apparent in a scope focused on an object closer than that for which it was adjusted. This apparent error may be eliminated by sighting into the rear lens of the rifle scope until the aiming reticle in the SITE-A-LINE is seen in sharpest detail, thus utilizing the optical center of the scope, which may be different from the mechanical center.

SITE-A-LINE is extremely rugged and will stay in collimation for a lifetime. If through neglect or accident repairs or adjustments are required the instrument should be returned to the factory for attention.